Suicide Prevention Resources

Suicide can be prevented

Whether you’re suicidal or know someone who is, know that there is help and there is hope.

Phone Numbers

Unless noted, these phone numbers are available 24/7.

Text & Chat

Don’t want to talk? You can also get support through text and chat.


How to Talk to Someone Who Is Suicidal

Please note: If the person you are talking to is in immediate danger do not leave them alone. Dial 911 from a landline or if you are off-campus. Dial UFPD Emergency 352-392-1111 from a cell phone if you are on campus.

Suicide is a difficult topic to discuss, especially with someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts. Here’s some tips to help make it a little easier.

  • When you talk to this person express your concern for them.
  • Don’t be afraid to address the topic of suicide directly. Ask this person if they ever think about suicide.
  • Listen to what they have to say, show interest in their concerns, offer them support, and take their situation seriously.
  • Don’t swear to secrecy. When someone tells you they want to commit suicide always consult with others and seek support.
  • Help this person find assistance and follow up with them after they get help.

Suicide Myths and Facts

There are many misconceptions about suicide and the behavior a person experiencing suicidal thought might show.

Myth: Talking about suicide may give someone the idea.

Fact: You don't give a suicidal person morbid ideas by talking about suicide. Bringing up the subject of suicide and discussing it openly is one of the most helpful things you can do.

Myth: People who talk about suicide won’t really do it.

Fact: Almost everyone who attempts or completes suicide has given some clue or warning. Do not ignore suicide threats.

Myth: If a person is determined to kill themselves, nothing is going to stop them.

Fact: Most suicidal people do not want death; they want the pain to stop. The impulse to end it all, however overpowering, does not last forever.

Myth: People who complete suicide are people who were unwilling to seek help.

Fact: Studies of suicide victims have shown that more than half had sought medical help within six months before their deaths.

Suicide can be prevented

Whether you’re suicidal or know someone who is, know that there is help and there is hope.

Phone Numbers

Unless noted, these phone numbers are available 24/7.

Text & Chat

Don’t want to talk? You can also get support through text and chat.


How to Talk to Someone Who Is Suicidal

Please note: If the person you are talking to is in immediate danger do not leave them alone. Dial 911 from a landline or if you are off-campus. Dial UFPD Emergency 352-392-1111 from a cell phone if you are on campus.

Suicide is a difficult topic to discuss, especially with someone who is experiencing suicidal thoughts. Here’s some tips to help make it a little easier.

  • When you talk to this person express your concern for them.
  • Don’t be afraid to address the topic of suicide directly. Ask this person if they ever think about suicide.
  • Listen to what they have to say, show interest in their concerns, offer them support, and take their situation seriously.
  • Don’t swear to secrecy. When someone tells you they want to commit suicide always consult with others and seek support.
  • Help this person find assistance and follow up with them after they get help.

Suicide Red Flags

There’s no single factor that can be identified as a sign that someone wants to commit suicide. However, there are some common signs that may indicate that someone is considering suicide and may be in need of help.

  • Changes in sleeping patterns or always feeling tired
  • Changes in appetite or fluctuations in weight
  • Feelings of worthlessness
  • Overwhelming guilt
  • Diminishing ability to think, concentrate or make decisions
  • Expressing feelings of abandonment
  • Expressing a feeling of being trapped with no way out
  • A sudden positive mood despite their situation not improving
  • Current or past psychiatric diagnosis (90% of individuals who die by suicide have had a mental health diagnosis)
  • A past history of attempted suicide (About 20% of people who die by suicide had previously attempted suicide)
  • Impulsive, self-destructive or risky behavior
  • A recent loss including relationships, career failure, or a purpose in life
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and society.
  • Talking or writing about death (sometimes indirectly)
  • Making statements as if they are saying goodbye or joking about suicide. (“My family would be better off without me”, “I wish I could kill myself” for example)
  • Suicidal individuals may communicate these sentiments through email, text messages, as Facebook posts or through other social media outlets.
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Writing goodbye letters
  • Seeking access to firearms, pills, or other means of committing suicide
  • Trouble going to classes, showing up at work, meeting socially with others, or doing basic tasks to take care of themselves.
  • Increased use of alcohol, use of other drugs

Looking for Suicide Prevention Training?

The Counseling and Wellness Center's Suicide Prevention & Education program is a campus-wide outreach and education program focused on the prevention of suicide through training.


Suicide Red Flags

There’s no single factor that can be identified as a sign that someone wants to commit suicide. However, there are some common signs that may indicate that someone is considering suicide and may be in need of help.

  • Changes in sleeping patterns or always feeling tired
  • Changes in appetite or fluctuations in weight
  • Feelings of worthlessness
  • Overwhelming guilt
  • Diminishing ability to think, concentrate or make decisions
  • Expressing feelings of abandonment
  • Expressing a feeling of being trapped with no way out
  • A sudden positive mood despite their situation not improving
  • Current or past psychiatric diagnosis (90% of individuals who die by suicide have had a mental health diagnosis)
  • A past history of attempted suicide (About 20% of people who die by suicide had previously attempted suicide)
  • Impulsive, self-destructive or risky behavior
  • A recent loss including relationships, career failure, or a purpose in life
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and society.
  • Talking or writing about death (sometimes indirectly)
  • Making statements as if they are saying goodbye or joking about suicide. (“My family would be better off without me”, “I wish I could kill myself” for example)
  • Suicidal individuals may communicate these sentiments through email, text messages, as Facebook posts or through other social media outlets.
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Writing goodbye letters
  • Seeking access to firearms, pills, or other means of committing suicide
  • Trouble going to classes, showing up at work, meeting socially with others, or doing basic tasks to take of themselves.
  • Increased use of alcohol, use of other drugs

Suicide Myths and Facts

There are many misconceptions about suicide and the behavior a person experiencing suicidal thought might show.

  • Connector.

    Myth: Talking about suicide may give someone the idea.

    Fact: You don’t give a suicidal person morbid ideas by talking about suicide. Bringing up the subject of suicide and discussing it openly is one of the most helpful things you can do.

  • Connector.

    Myth: People who talk about suicide won’t really do it.

    Fact: Almost everyone who attempts or completes suicide has given some clue or warning. Do not ignore suicide threats.

  • Connector.

    Myth: If a person is determined to kill themselves, nothing is going to stop them.

    Fact: Most suicidal people do not want death; they want the pain to stop. The impulse to end it all, however overpowering, does not last forever.

  • Connector.

    Myth: People who complete suicide are people who were unwilling to seek help.

    Fact: Studies of suicide victims have shown that more than half had sought medical help within six months before their deaths.


Looking for Suicide Prevention Training?

The Counseling and Wellness Center's Suicide Prevention & Education program is a campus-wide outreach and education program focused on the prevention of suicide through training.

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